Home Collections Women at Work: Manual Labor Pre- and Non-industrial labor  William Lamb Collection
William Lamb diaries, 1836-1841
Catalog Record
Mss:9353 1836-1841 L218

William Lamb may have been an inmate at the House of Industry in South Boston, a poorhouse established in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1823. The house had a hospital and a school and took in men, women, and children from Massachusetts cities and towns. The organization fed, clothed, nursed, and schooled the occupants. The inmates earned their keep by producing palm-leaf hats, working in the gardens, and at times, by providing contract labor outside the house. The house also acquired income by selling produce from its gardens and by raising silkworms.

The collection consists of four interleaved almanacs for the years 1836, 1839, 1840 and 1841 written by a William Lamb. The bulk of the entries are concerning the House of Industry, including admittance and release dates, observations on superintendents and staff, comments on social and work conditions (in particular the slaughtering of hogs) and statistics. Lamb also made note of weather reports, political and shipping news, Fourth of July celebrations, historical events and deaths.

See also the House of Industry (South Boston, Massachusetts) Collection
Mss 9353 1839-1846 H848
Volume 1

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Home Collections Women at Work: Manual Labor Pre- and Non-industrial labor  William Lamb Collection
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